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Linux device drivers development john madieu pdf + download

Linux kernel is a complex, portable, modular and widely used piece of software, running on around 80% of servers and embedded systems in more than half of devices throughout the World. Device drivers play a critical role in how well a Linux system performs. As Linux has turned out to be one of the most popular operating systems used, the interest in developing proprietary device drivers is also increasing steadily. This book will initially help you understand the basics of drivers as well as prepare for the long journey through the Linux Kernel. This book then covers drivers development based on various Linux subsystems such as memory management, PWM, RTC, IIO, IRQ management, and so on. The book also offers a practical approach on direct memory access and network device drivers. By the end of this book, you will be comfortable with the concept of device driver development and will be in a position to write any device driver from scratch using the latest kernel version (v4.13 at the time of writing this book). Linux started as a hobby project in 1991 for a Finnish student, Linus Torvalds. The project has gradually grown and still does, with roughly 1,000 contributors around the world. Nowadays, Linux is a must, in embedded systems as well as on servers. A kernel is a center part of an operating system, and its development is not so obvious. Linux offers many advantages over other operating systems: This book tries to be as generic as possible. There is a special topic, device tree, which is not a full x86 feature yet. That topic will then be dedicated to ARM processors, and all those fully supporting the device tree. Because they are most used on desktop and servers (for x86), and on embedded systems (ARM). This chapter deals, among other things, with: I'm running Ubuntu 16.04, on an ASUS Ro G, with an Intel core i7 (eight physical cores), 16 GB of RAM, 256 GB of SSD, and 1 TB of magnetic hard drive. My favorite editor is Vim, but you are free to use the one you are most comfortable with. In the early kernel days (until 2003), odd-even versioning styles were used, where odd numbers were stable and even numbers were unstable. When the 2.6 version was released, the versioning scheme switched to X. Z, where: This is called semantic versioning, and has been used until the 2.6.39 version; when Linus Torvalds decided to bump the version to 3.0, which also meant the end of semantic versioning in 2011, and then an X. When it came to the 3.20 version, Linus argued that he could no longer increase Y, and decided to switch to an arbitrary versioning scheme, incrementing X whenever Y got large enough that he ran out of fingers and toes to count it. S AS arch/arm/boot/compressed/hyp-stub.o AS arch/arm/boot/compressed/lib1funcs.o AS arch/arm/boot/compressed/ashldi3.o AS arch/arm/boot/compressed/bswapsdi2.o AS arch/arm/boot/compressed/piggy.o LD arch/arm/boot/compressed/vmlinux OBJCOPY arch/arm/boot/z Image Kernel: arch/arm/boot/z Image is ready in the kernel source tree. This is the reason why the version has moved from 3.20 to 4.0 directly. This coding style is a set of rules you should respect, at least if you need to get patches accepted by kernel developers. Have a look at [...] LZO arch/arm/boot/compressed/piggy_data CC arch/arm/boot/compressed/misc.o CC arch/arm/boot/compressed/decompress.o CC arch/arm/boot/compressed/string.o SHIPPED arch/arm/boot/compressed/hyp-stub. Some of these rules concern indentation, program flow, naming conventions, and so on. The most popular ones are: The scope of the static objects is visible in the whole driver, and by every device this driver manages. Dynamically allocated objects are visible only by the device that is actually using a given instance of the module. structure is the centerpiece of this implementation. It even brings in a reference counter, so that the kernel may know how many users actually use the object. Every object has a parent, and has an entry in This chapter explained in a very short and simple manner how you should download the Linux source and process a first build. That said, this chapter is quite brief and may not be enough, but never mind, it is just an introduction. That is why the next chapter gets more into the details of the kernel building process; how to actually compile a driver, either externally or as a part of the kernel; as well as some basics that you should learn before starting the long journey that kernel development represents. Linux kernel is a complex, portable, modular and widely used piece of software, running on around 80% of servers and embedded systems in more than half of devices throughout the World. Device drivers play a critical role in how well a Linux system performs. As Linux has turned out to be one of the most popular operating systems used, the interest in developing proprietary device drivers is also increasing steadily. This book will initially help you understand the basics of drivers as well as prepare for the long journey through the Linux Kernel. This book then covers drivers development based on various Linux subsystems such as memory management, PWM, RTC, IIO, IRQ management, and so on. The book also offers a practical approach on direct memory access and network device drivers. By the end of this book, you will be comfortable with the concept of device driver development and will be in a position to write any device driver from scratch using the latest kernel version (v4.13 at the time of writing this book). Linux started as a hobby project in 1991 for a Finnish student, Linus Torvalds. The project has gradually grown and still does, with roughly 1,000 contributors around the world. Nowadays, Linux is a must, in embedded systems as well as on servers. A kernel is a center part of an operating system, and its development is not so obvious. Linux offers many advantages over other operating systems: This book tries to be as generic as possible. There is a special topic, device tree, which is not a full x86 feature yet. That topic will then be dedicated to ARM processors, and all those fully supporting the device tree. Because they are most used on desktop and servers (for x86), and on embedded systems (ARM). This chapter deals, among other things, with: I'm running Ubuntu 16.04, on an ASUS Ro G, with an Intel core i7 (eight physical cores), 16 GB of RAM, 256 GB of SSD, and 1 TB of magnetic hard drive. My favorite editor is Vim, but you are free to use the one you are most comfortable with. In the early kernel days (until 2003), odd-even versioning styles were used, where odd numbers were stable and even numbers were unstable. When the 2.6 version was released, the versioning scheme switched to X. Z, where: This is called semantic versioning, and has been used until the 2.6.39 version; when Linus Torvalds decided to bump the version to 3.0, which also meant the end of semantic versioning in 2011, and then an X. When it came to the 3.20 version, Linus argued that he could no longer increase Y, and decided to switch to an arbitrary versioning scheme, incrementing X whenever Y got large enough that he ran out of fingers and toes to count it. S AS arch/arm/boot/compressed/hyp-stub.o AS arch/arm/boot/compressed/lib1funcs.o AS arch/arm/boot/compressed/ashldi3.o AS arch/arm/boot/compressed/bswapsdi2.o AS arch/arm/boot/compressed/piggy.o LD arch/arm/boot/compressed/vmlinux OBJCOPY arch/arm/boot/z Image Kernel: arch/arm/boot/z Image is ready in the kernel source tree. This is the reason why the version has moved from 3.20 to 4.0 directly. This coding style is a set of rules you should respect, at least if you need to get patches accepted by kernel developers. Have a look at [...] LZO arch/arm/boot/compressed/piggy_data CC arch/arm/boot/compressed/misc.o CC arch/arm/boot/compressed/decompress.o CC arch/arm/boot/compressed/string.o SHIPPED arch/arm/boot/compressed/hyp-stub. Some of these rules concern indentation, program flow, naming conventions, and so on. The most popular ones are: The scope of the static objects is visible in the whole driver, and by every device this driver manages. Dynamically allocated objects are visible only by the device that is actually using a given instance of the module. structure is the centerpiece of this implementation. It even brings in a reference counter, so that the kernel may know how many users actually use the object. Every object has a parent, and has an entry in This chapter explained in a very short and simple manner how you should download the Linux source and process a first build. That said, this chapter is quite brief and may not be enough, but never mind, it is just an introduction. That is why the next chapter gets more into the details of the kernel building process; how to actually compile a driver, either externally or as a part of the kernel; as well as some basics that you should learn before starting the long journey that kernel development represents.

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