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Start With NO Author: Jim Camp Publisher: Crown Business, Crown Publishing Group Date of Publication: 2002 ISBN: 0-609-60800-2 Number of Pages: 259 pages About the Author The Big Idea Jim Camp Jim Camp has coached people through thousands of negotiations at more than 150 companies, i n c l u d i n g M o t o r o l a , Te x a s Instruments, Merrill Lynch, IBM, and Prudential Insurance, as well as many other smaller companies in a wide range of industries. We have heard about it before - the infamous win-win situation. He has lectured at graduate business schools in the United States and has been a featured speaker at Inc. Negotiators are told that their most important task is to find a situation where both parties come out happy or as “winners”. In this book, Jim Camp, shows you how win-win situation are just fairy tales, and how you can make all the difference in your negotiations by starting with one very important word - NO. Chapter 1 - Your Greatest Weakness in Negotiation: The Dangers of Neediness It is important to remember that humans are, by nature, predators. The same way animal trainers at the zoo always keep in mind that the animals they are handling are ready to pounce on anything they see as a weakness, so should you always keep in mind that when negotiating, it is important not to show any weakness. It is important not to show any neediness, because if you do, you lose. “No Talk” Talking and showing of need go hand and hand. The pitch and tone of your voice can betray your emotions. Most top negotiators speak only when needed, and even then in a cool, controlled manner. Published by Business Summaries, Building 3005 Unit 258, 4440 NW 73rd Ave, Miami, Florida 33166 ©2003 Business Summaries All rights reserved. No part of this summary may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without prior notice of Business Start With NO By Jim Camp Don’t Worry About Rejection Fear of rejection (which stems from a need to be liked) is a sign of neediness. But, when you think about it, your adversary in a negotiation can't truly reject you. They don't have that sort of power and you should NEVER let them feel that they have that kind of power over you. Wanting is Fine, Needing is Not Neediness is something that must be avoided at all costs. Instead, try substituting the word “want” for “need”. For instance instead of telling yourself that you need a bright red sports car, tell yourself that you want a bright red sports car. Chapter 2 - The Columbo Effect: The Secret of Being “Not Okay” Columbo was a TV detective, but certainly not the sleek, well-dressed detectives we see on television today. Yet, because he seemed so safe and unthreatening, he was able to get information from people. Being “not okay” does not mean being unprofessional. It is a sad fact that most humans, when presented with a human “more okay” (or so they think) than them, respond by feeling “not okay”. It's about being okay with not being perfect - letting go of the need to make everyone think you're the smartest, the best, etc. They therefore get defensive and are put on the edge. It is a form of honesty and moves negotiations along. So a great advise for people going into negotiations? Chapter 3 - Start With NO: How Decisions Move Negotiations Forward All negotiations begin with emotion. The trick is to acknowledge that emotions may rule your decisions at first, but they do not have to be the final word. Your job is to get BEYOND the emotions, or use them to your advantage with precise decisionmaking. Forget “Yes”, Forget “Maybe” [2] Start With NO By Jim Camp A “Yes” at the beginning of a negotiation is not too good an idea as things still change over the course of time. A “Maybe” on the other hand will drive the other side crazy, but it will drag negotiations out for a long period, which wastes valuable time and money. A “No” on the other hand makes the other side think. It shows that you are not needy, and it will inevitably lead to the closing of the deal. Simply inviting the word, “No”, can lead to great success. For instance, a college applicant who was a good athlete applied to many schools. But, in his letter he pointedly asked for the colleges to tell him if he was NOT academically qualified. He then wrote to the coaches of the schools and asked them to tell him if he wasn't qualified to be on their varsity program, because if he wasn't, he would move on and concentrate his energy on other schools. With these invitations for a “No” he got a great number of people to say “Yes”. The Right to Say “No” So what exactly is a negotiation? A negotiation is simply an agreement between two or more parties, with all parties having the right to veto. This means that all parties involved HAVE THE RIGHT TO SAY NO. Never “Save the Adversary” or “Save the Relationship” During negotiations, you are there in order to get the terms that are most profitable for you or your company. After all, a negotiation is a series of decisions, not just one. You are not there to get more friends or be the most liked person in the room. The NEXT Decision The fear of hurting other people's feelings or wanting to be liked is one of the reasons we fear saying no. If you do make a bad decision, just learn from it and move on with your subsequent decisions. Being scared of making the wrong decision is another reason why we're scared of saying no. One Last Time Embrace “NO” at every chance in a negotiation. Don't be scared of the word, it can actually do you a lot of good. [3] Start With NO By Jim Camp Chapter 4 - Success Comes from This Foundation: Develop Your Mission and Purpose The foundation of effective decision-making is a mission and purpose to guide it. Effective decision-making is effective negotiation plain and simple. A valid mission and purpose will help keep you on track when difficult decisions have to be made. So what exactly happens when you don't have a mission and vision? Well, to put it bluntly, if you're not working on behalf of your own mission and vision, then you are working on behalf of someone else's. Money and Power Are Not Valid “I want to be a millionaire”, “I want to be the CEO of this company” - these sound like mission statements right? [ 10 ] ABOUT BUSINESSSUMMARIES Business is a business book summaries service. Technically yes, but they are actually narrow and short sighted. Every week, it sends out to subscribers a 9- to 12-page summary of a best-selling business book chosen from among the hundreds of books printed out in the United States every week. The main problem with these statements is that they are totally I-centered. Money and power shouldn't be the mission themselves, but the result of a meaningful mission and vision. Don't forget, money for money's sake corrupts, and power for power's sake also corrupts. Your M & P is Set in Your Adversary’s World You have to keep your adversary in mind when making your mission and purpose. Yes, this may be confusing advice to some after all it is YOUR mission and purpose and no one else's right? The thing to remember here is that you don't live in this world alone - no one does. So, a businessman has to keep the customer in mind when making his mission and purpose. For a politician, his mission should be set in the world of his constituents, and for a negotiator, his (or her) mission should be set in the world of his adversary. It is also possible for a person or company to have more than one mission and purpose. Remember, a valid mission and purpose will never let you down. The point of this chapter however, is to identify the difference between goals and results. Chapter 5 - Stop Trying to Control the Outcome: Focus on Your Behavior and Actions Instead People want results. To put it simply, goals you can control and results you cannot. The problem lies in actually attaining these results. But, by following your behavioral goals, it IS possible to get the results that you want. One of the most important things to learn is the difference between a goal and a result. So we cannot control certain things (like results) but we can control our own actions that make it possible for our desired results to happen. It is also identifying what you can and cannot control. The Negotiation Never Ends Although the ink may be dry on the contract, it doesn't mean that the negotiations are over. Control What You Can Control, Forget the Rest In a nutshell, in negotiations there are four obtainable, straightforward goals that can make one an excellent negotiator. Negotiations usually lead to more negotiations and so on and so forth. These four goals are: [4] Start With NO By Jim Camp 1. Beware Unworthy Goals One common mistake is setting unmanageable goals or those beyond your scope and control. You can also go the opposite way and waste time on insufficient or unworthy goals. A Daily Track Helps You Monitor Your Work You've heard it all before in other fields - write it down. Our greatest strength is our greatest weakness (Emerson) . Keep a daily record in order to be able to identify your strengths and weaknesses. Fuels of the Camp System: Questions The single most important fuel of negotiations is the ability to ask questions. Remember, no vision, no real decision: this is a rule of human nature. The Power of the Correct Question Asking questions is both a science and an art. For the “science” part (the construction of the sentence) questions usually start with a verb such as the words Is, Can, Will and Do. You don't want to ask a question that may produce a maybe. You don't want to ask a question that makes it seem that you're rushing to close. You don't want to ask a question that takes away the right to say no. The art part of asking questions lies in the delivery. More Fuels of the Camp System Nurturing This means to feed emotionally, to provide moral training, to foster the mind with good and understanding and appreciative thoughts. [5] Start With NO By Jim Camp It’s Hard to Go Wrong with Interrogative-Led Questions If you start questions with the common: Who, What, Where, Why and How, it's hard to go wrong because the answers to these questions are usually concrete. In negotiations, nurturing will keep the negotiation going through thick and thin. In connecting, you are using words and phrases to nurture and to better understand the people you're negotiating with. The greatest presentation you will ever give is one your adversary will never see. A negotiation is only over when you want it to be over. Keep It Simple Keep your questions short and simple. This is another way to make your adversary feel okay. Here's an example of how the word “and” is used as a connector: Patient: “Doctor you're not helping me at all” Doctor: “Help me Understand” Patient: “Well, I just don't feel as though I am making any progress” Doctor: “Annndd? Reversing Reversing is a behavioral tactic that answers a question with a question - the answer to which will do you some good. Here's a concrete example: Client: “Jim, what will this option do for me? Before we get into that, what's the biggest challenge you're facing in this area? ” Patient: “I'm having trouble doing the exercises you told me to do” Doctor: “I see. ” Connecting We all have a tendency to want to save our adversary or to be liked. What's the most difficult problem you're having with the [6] Start With NO By Jim Camp exercises? This in turn can lead us to commit the following errors: 1. ” Three Plus (3 ) This is the ability to remain with a question until it is answered at least three times, or to repeat a statement at least three times. All agreements must be clarified point by point and sealed the times (3 ). The clearer the picture of pain, the easier the decision-making process. The value of negotiation increases by multiples as time, energy, money, and emotion are spent. The Strip Line A pendulum swings back and forth, back and forth, back and forth. All these back and forth emotional swings are not good for negotiations. The goal is to keep the pendulum as close as possible to a calm, stationary mode. Chapter 8 - Quiet Your Mind, Create a Blank Slate: No Expectations, No Assumptions, No Talking Blank slate is a behavioral goal that allows negotiators to create a blank slate in their own minds so that what is REALLY going on in the negotiation can be seen. Your Positive and Negative Expectations Are Killers Positive expectations have the danger of developing quickly into neediness. You really need to go in with a blank slate and have no expectations at all. Conversely, negative expectations can also complicate negotiations. Do Your Research This habit can rid us of many assumptions and help us blank slate. Assume Nothing There are a million assumptions out there to be made, and they are just as dangerous as positive and negative expectations. Study and gather facts about the companies and markets involved. This should help you blank slate and should be one of the first things you do when entering a negotiation. It Couldn’t Be Simpler The best simple, foolproof tool we have in order to blank slate is to take great notes. This automatically reinforces listening skills and keeps us in our adversary's world. Spilling the Beans [7] Start With NO By Jim Camp In this case, less is more. Keep in mind, the less you talk unnecessarily, the less chances of spilling the beans or letting something slip that you really shouldn't have. Money has nothing to do with a valid mission and purpose. Never, ever, spill your beans in the lobby-or anywhere else. Never enter a negotiation without a valid agenda 7. Chapter 9 - Know Their “Pain”, Paint Their “Pain”: Work with Your Adversary’s Real Problem Pain, in this context, is what the negotiator sees as the current or future problem. The only valid goals are those that you can control: behavior and activity. Mission and Purpose must be set in the adversary's world; our world must be secondary. Spend maximum time on payside activity and minimum time on nonpayside activity. In many cases, the pain will be pretty straightforward. You May Have to Really Hunt for the Pain Understanding and knowing this pain can be the key to having successful negotiations. Again, it goes back to vision and making decisions. When the pain is not apparent, you may have to really hunt for it but even then, don't stop until you find it. Painting Pain is not Creating Pain This is NOT about putting people in pain. It is about seeing clearly your adversary's pain and painting a picture of it. You Cannot Tell Anyone Anything Trying to convince or tell someone something so that he or she can see the same things you are seeing isn't going to work. Chapter 10 - The Real Budget and How to Build it: The Importance of Time, Energy, Money and Emotion The Time-and-Energy Budget Time is a valuable commodity and it should be treated as such. Every negotiation is an agreement between two or more parties with all parties having the right to veto - the right to say “no”. Don't hand out appointments left and right and waste it. Also, make the most of whatever time you do have during negotiations. However, don't make the mistake of blurting out too much in order to “fit” everything you have to say into a short period of time. In terms of energy, always be aware of your own personal health and stamina. Bad deals are usually signed when one or both parties [8] Start With NO By Jim Camp are simply too tired to care anymore. The Money Budget The value of anything goes up when money is involved. Just as with time and energy, you want money to work for you and against your adversary. This is especially hard to do in large multi-level, multi-national companies. You will try to drive up your adversary's budget by making the negotiation expensive- and he or she will try to do the same. Chapter 11 - The Shell Game: Be Sure You Know the Real Decision Makers Who's calling the shots? You’ll Have to Deal with the Blockers These are the people who say that THEY are the real decision makers when in fact they are not. Chapter 12 - Have an Agenda and Work It: Ride the Chaos Inherent in Negotiation This system is designed to help control the chaos inherent in a negotiation. You must know your own budget and that of your adversary's. Every Agenda Must be Negotiated In this system there are no hidden agendas. The Emotion Budget Emotions run high in negotiations- from the highs of triumphs to the agony of defeats. The only agenda that is valid for purpose of negotiations is one that has been negotiated with the adversary. Start With NO Author: Jim Camp Publisher: Crown Business, Crown Publishing Group Date of Publication: 2002 ISBN: 0-609-60800-2 Number of Pages: 259 pages About the Author The Big Idea Jim Camp Jim Camp has coached people through thousands of negotiations at more than 150 companies, i n c l u d i n g M o t o r o l a , Te x a s Instruments, Merrill Lynch, IBM, and Prudential Insurance, as well as many other smaller companies in a wide range of industries. We have heard about it before - the infamous win-win situation. He has lectured at graduate business schools in the United States and has been a featured speaker at Inc. Negotiators are told that their most important task is to find a situation where both parties come out happy or as “winners”. In this book, Jim Camp, shows you how win-win situation are just fairy tales, and how you can make all the difference in your negotiations by starting with one very important word - NO. Chapter 1 - Your Greatest Weakness in Negotiation: The Dangers of Neediness It is important to remember that humans are, by nature, predators. The same way animal trainers at the zoo always keep in mind that the animals they are handling are ready to pounce on anything they see as a weakness, so should you always keep in mind that when negotiating, it is important not to show any weakness. It is important not to show any neediness, because if you do, you lose. “No Talk” Talking and showing of need go hand and hand. The pitch and tone of your voice can betray your emotions. Most top negotiators speak only when needed, and even then in a cool, controlled manner. Published by Business Summaries, Building 3005 Unit 258, 4440 NW 73rd Ave, Miami, Florida 33166 ©2003 Business Summaries All rights reserved. No part of this summary may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without prior notice of Business Start With NO By Jim Camp Don’t Worry About Rejection Fear of rejection (which stems from a need to be liked) is a sign of neediness. But, when you think about it, your adversary in a negotiation can't truly reject you. They don't have that sort of power and you should NEVER let them feel that they have that kind of power over you. Wanting is Fine, Needing is Not Neediness is something that must be avoided at all costs. Instead, try substituting the word “want” for “need”. For instance instead of telling yourself that you need a bright red sports car, tell yourself that you want a bright red sports car. Chapter 2 - The Columbo Effect: The Secret of Being “Not Okay” Columbo was a TV detective, but certainly not the sleek, well-dressed detectives we see on television today. Yet, because he seemed so safe and unthreatening, he was able to get information from people. Being “not okay” does not mean being unprofessional. It is a sad fact that most humans, when presented with a human “more okay” (or so they think) than them, respond by feeling “not okay”. It's about being okay with not being perfect - letting go of the need to make everyone think you're the smartest, the best, etc. They therefore get defensive and are put on the edge. It is a form of honesty and moves negotiations along. So a great advise for people going into negotiations? Chapter 3 - Start With NO: How Decisions Move Negotiations Forward All negotiations begin with emotion. The trick is to acknowledge that emotions may rule your decisions at first, but they do not have to be the final word. Your job is to get BEYOND the emotions, or use them to your advantage with precise decisionmaking. Forget “Yes”, Forget “Maybe” [2] Start With NO By Jim Camp A “Yes” at the beginning of a negotiation is not too good an idea as things still change over the course of time. A “Maybe” on the other hand will drive the other side crazy, but it will drag negotiations out for a long period, which wastes valuable time and money. A “No” on the other hand makes the other side think. It shows that you are not needy, and it will inevitably lead to the closing of the deal. Simply inviting the word, “No”, can lead to great success. For instance, a college applicant who was a good athlete applied to many schools. But, in his letter he pointedly asked for the colleges to tell him if he was NOT academically qualified. He then wrote to the coaches of the schools and asked them to tell him if he wasn't qualified to be on their varsity program, because if he wasn't, he would move on and concentrate his energy on other schools. With these invitations for a “No” he got a great number of people to say “Yes”. The Right to Say “No” So what exactly is a negotiation? A negotiation is simply an agreement between two or more parties, with all parties having the right to veto. This means that all parties involved HAVE THE RIGHT TO SAY NO. Never “Save the Adversary” or “Save the Relationship” During negotiations, you are there in order to get the terms that are most profitable for you or your company. After all, a negotiation is a series of decisions, not just one. You are not there to get more friends or be the most liked person in the room. The NEXT Decision The fear of hurting other people's feelings or wanting to be liked is one of the reasons we fear saying no. If you do make a bad decision, just learn from it and move on with your subsequent decisions. Being scared of making the wrong decision is another reason why we're scared of saying no. One Last Time Embrace “NO” at every chance in a negotiation. Don't be scared of the word, it can actually do you a lot of good. [3] Start With NO By Jim Camp Chapter 4 - Success Comes from This Foundation: Develop Your Mission and Purpose The foundation of effective decision-making is a mission and purpose to guide it. Effective decision-making is effective negotiation plain and simple. A valid mission and purpose will help keep you on track when difficult decisions have to be made. So what exactly happens when you don't have a mission and vision? Well, to put it bluntly, if you're not working on behalf of your own mission and vision, then you are working on behalf of someone else's. Money and Power Are Not Valid “I want to be a millionaire”, “I want to be the CEO of this company” - these sound like mission statements right? [ 10 ] ABOUT BUSINESSSUMMARIES Business is a business book summaries service. Technically yes, but they are actually narrow and short sighted. Every week, it sends out to subscribers a 9- to 12-page summary of a best-selling business book chosen from among the hundreds of books printed out in the United States every week. The main problem with these statements is that they are totally I-centered. Money and power shouldn't be the mission themselves, but the result of a meaningful mission and vision. Don't forget, money for money's sake corrupts, and power for power's sake also corrupts. Your M & P is Set in Your Adversary’s World You have to keep your adversary in mind when making your mission and purpose. Yes, this may be confusing advice to some after all it is YOUR mission and purpose and no one else's right? The thing to remember here is that you don't live in this world alone - no one does. So, a businessman has to keep the customer in mind when making his mission and purpose. For a politician, his mission should be set in the world of his constituents, and for a negotiator, his (or her) mission should be set in the world of his adversary. It is also possible for a person or company to have more than one mission and purpose. Remember, a valid mission and purpose will never let you down. The point of this chapter however, is to identify the difference between goals and results. Chapter 5 - Stop Trying to Control the Outcome: Focus on Your Behavior and Actions Instead People want results. To put it simply, goals you can control and results you cannot. The problem lies in actually attaining these results. But, by following your behavioral goals, it IS possible to get the results that you want. One of the most important things to learn is the difference between a goal and a result. So we cannot control certain things (like results) but we can control our own actions that make it possible for our desired results to happen. It is also identifying what you can and cannot control. The Negotiation Never Ends Although the ink may be dry on the contract, it doesn't mean that the negotiations are over. Control What You Can Control, Forget the Rest In a nutshell, in negotiations there are four obtainable, straightforward goals that can make one an excellent negotiator. Negotiations usually lead to more negotiations and so on and so forth. These four goals are: [4] Start With NO By Jim Camp 1. Beware Unworthy Goals One common mistake is setting unmanageable goals or those beyond your scope and control. You can also go the opposite way and waste time on insufficient or unworthy goals. A Daily Track Helps You Monitor Your Work You've heard it all before in other fields - write it down. Our greatest strength is our greatest weakness (Emerson) . Keep a daily record in order to be able to identify your strengths and weaknesses. Fuels of the Camp System: Questions The single most important fuel of negotiations is the ability to ask questions. Remember, no vision, no real decision: this is a rule of human nature. The Power of the Correct Question Asking questions is both a science and an art. For the “science” part (the construction of the sentence) questions usually start with a verb such as the words Is, Can, Will and Do. You don't want to ask a question that may produce a maybe. You don't want to ask a question that makes it seem that you're rushing to close. You don't want to ask a question that takes away the right to say no. The art part of asking questions lies in the delivery. More Fuels of the Camp System Nurturing This means to feed emotionally, to provide moral training, to foster the mind with good and understanding and appreciative thoughts. [5] Start With NO By Jim Camp It’s Hard to Go Wrong with Interrogative-Led Questions If you start questions with the common: Who, What, Where, Why and How, it's hard to go wrong because the answers to these questions are usually concrete. In negotiations, nurturing will keep the negotiation going through thick and thin. In connecting, you are using words and phrases to nurture and to better understand the people you're negotiating with. The greatest presentation you will ever give is one your adversary will never see. A negotiation is only over when you want it to be over. Keep It Simple Keep your questions short and simple. This is another way to make your adversary feel okay. Here's an example of how the word “and” is used as a connector: Patient: “Doctor you're not helping me at all” Doctor: “Help me Understand” Patient: “Well, I just don't feel as though I am making any progress” Doctor: “Annndd? Reversing Reversing is a behavioral tactic that answers a question with a question - the answer to which will do you some good. Here's a concrete example: Client: “Jim, what will this option do for me? Before we get into that, what's the biggest challenge you're facing in this area? ” Patient: “I'm having trouble doing the exercises you told me to do” Doctor: “I see. ” Connecting We all have a tendency to want to save our adversary or to be liked. What's the most difficult problem you're having with the [6] Start With NO By Jim Camp exercises? This in turn can lead us to commit the following errors: 1. ” Three Plus (3 ) This is the ability to remain with a question until it is answered at least three times, or to repeat a statement at least three times. All agreements must be clarified point by point and sealed the times (3 ). The clearer the picture of pain, the easier the decision-making process. The value of negotiation increases by multiples as time, energy, money, and emotion are spent. The Strip Line A pendulum swings back and forth, back and forth, back and forth. All these back and forth emotional swings are not good for negotiations. The goal is to keep the pendulum as close as possible to a calm, stationary mode. Chapter 8 - Quiet Your Mind, Create a Blank Slate: No Expectations, No Assumptions, No Talking Blank slate is a behavioral goal that allows negotiators to create a blank slate in their own minds so that what is REALLY going on in the negotiation can be seen. Your Positive and Negative Expectations Are Killers Positive expectations have the danger of developing quickly into neediness. You really need to go in with a blank slate and have no expectations at all. Conversely, negative expectations can also complicate negotiations. Do Your Research This habit can rid us of many assumptions and help us blank slate. Assume Nothing There are a million assumptions out there to be made, and they are just as dangerous as positive and negative expectations. Study and gather facts about the companies and markets involved. This should help you blank slate and should be one of the first things you do when entering a negotiation. It Couldn’t Be Simpler The best simple, foolproof tool we have in order to blank slate is to take great notes. This automatically reinforces listening skills and keeps us in our adversary's world. Spilling the Beans [7] Start With NO By Jim Camp In this case, less is more. Keep in mind, the less you talk unnecessarily, the less chances of spilling the beans or letting something slip that you really shouldn't have. Money has nothing to do with a valid mission and purpose. Never, ever, spill your beans in the lobby-or anywhere else. Never enter a negotiation without a valid agenda 7. Chapter 9 - Know Their “Pain”, Paint Their “Pain”: Work with Your Adversary’s Real Problem Pain, in this context, is what the negotiator sees as the current or future problem. The only valid goals are those that you can control: behavior and activity. Mission and Purpose must be set in the adversary's world; our world must be secondary. Spend maximum time on payside activity and minimum time on nonpayside activity. In many cases, the pain will be pretty straightforward. You May Have to Really Hunt for the Pain Understanding and knowing this pain can be the key to having successful negotiations. Again, it goes back to vision and making decisions. When the pain is not apparent, you may have to really hunt for it but even then, don't stop until you find it. Painting Pain is not Creating Pain This is NOT about putting people in pain. It is about seeing clearly your adversary's pain and painting a picture of it. You Cannot Tell Anyone Anything Trying to convince or tell someone something so that he or she can see the same things you are seeing isn't going to work. Chapter 10 - The Real Budget and How to Build it: The Importance of Time, Energy, Money and Emotion The Time-and-Energy Budget Time is a valuable commodity and it should be treated as such. Every negotiation is an agreement between two or more parties with all parties having the right to veto - the right to say “no”. Don't hand out appointments left and right and waste it. Also, make the most of whatever time you do have during negotiations. However, don't make the mistake of blurting out too much in order to “fit” everything you have to say into a short period of time. In terms of energy, always be aware of your own personal health and stamina. Bad deals are usually signed when one or both parties [8] Start With NO By Jim Camp are simply too tired to care anymore. The Money Budget The value of anything goes up when money is involved. Just as with time and energy, you want money to work for you and against your adversary. This is especially hard to do in large multi-level, multi-national companies. You will try to drive up your adversary's budget by making the negotiation expensive- and he or she will try to do the same. Chapter 11 - The Shell Game: Be Sure You Know the Real Decision Makers Who's calling the shots? You’ll Have to Deal with the Blockers These are the people who say that THEY are the real decision makers when in fact they are not. Chapter 12 - Have an Agenda and Work It: Ride the Chaos Inherent in Negotiation This system is designed to help control the chaos inherent in a negotiation. You must know your own budget and that of your adversary's. Every Agenda Must be Negotiated In this system there are no hidden agendas. The Emotion Budget Emotions run high in negotiations- from the highs of triumphs to the agony of defeats. The only agenda that is valid for purpose of negotiations is one that has been negotiated with the adversary.

date: 25-Aug-2021 22:02next


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